Inquiry Learning Post 3: Expert Searches ProQuest

ProQuest

Screen Shot ProQuest 1

Search Terms/Keywords Results Comments
  1. inquiry learning   See image above
136,813 A large number of results as expected. Surprisingly, I located several articles quickly that are relevant. Especially one by Sessums (2009) dealing with online inquiry. Too many to scan through quickly.
  1. “inquiry learning” English
2353 Using the quotation marks and the term English resulted in a much smaller number of entries. There are again several useful articles in particular, Inquiry learning: A narrative inquiry into the experiences of three teachers by Hunsburger (2008). This may provide some answers for me regarding the actual practice of teachers in inquiry-oriented classrooms. The search brings up a lot of discipline areas that are outside my scope.
  1. “inquiry learning” English AND Secondary
1011 Using the Boolean operator AND narrowed the results but there seems to be less relevancy. There is certainly mention of the secondary area and inquiry learning but English seems to have slipped away into the ether.
  1. “inquiry learning” “English” AND Distance Education
491 Certainly much fewer results. Again the relevance is limited. A few articles appeared from previous searches. Nothing stands out.
  1. “English” “inquiry learning” OR “guided inquiry learning” AND Secondary
2352 Putting “English” first proved successful in bringing up more English and inquiry learning related materials. The article, Reading Skills-What School Librarians Need to Know by Rojtas-Milliner (2010) looks to be very informative. Scrolling further down Kuhlthau (2010) pops out at me, Guided Inquiry: School Libraries in the 21st Century… a useful find. Overall I have not found a great deal using ProQuest as a large number of items centered around teaching English as a second language.

References:

Hunsburger, Winifred Frances. !2008) Inquiry learning: A narrative inquiry into the experiences of three teachers University of Toronto (Canada), ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing. Retrieved on August 20th, 2014 from http://search.proquest.com.ezp01.library.qut.edu.au/cv_159420/docview/304339271/7D8479EB602F42ABPQ/1?accountid=13380

Kuhlthau,C. (2010) Guided inquiry : School libraries in the 21st century. School Libraries Worldwide, 16 (1), 17-28. Retrieved on August 20th,2014 from http://search.proquest.com.ezp01.library.qut.edu.au/cv_159420/docview/217762150/84151347CB384BDCPQ/15?accountid=13380

Rojtas-Milliner, Mary Cay. (Feb 2010) Reading Skills-What School Librarians Need to Know School Library Monthly26.6: pp50-52. Retrieved on August 20th, 2014 from http://search.proquest.com.ezp01.library.qut.edu.au/cv_159420/docview/237130318/84151347CB384BDCPQ/11?accountid=13380

Sessums, Christopher Davis. (2209) The path from insight to action: The case of an online learning community in support of collaborative teacher inquiry University of Florida, ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing. Retrieved on August 20th. 2014 from http://search.proquest.com.ezp01.library.qut.edu.au/cv_159420/docview/304888007/E87D088B1E6647F3PQ/6?accountid=13380

What do I want to know? 

1) Are there any professional criticisms of inquiry learning?

2) How would students learn something like music using inquiry learning?

3) Is inquiry learning suitable for students with disabilities?

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2 thoughts on “Inquiry Learning Post 3: Expert Searches ProQuest

  1. Pingback: Table of Contents | cocon11

  2. Hi Catherine,

    I found that I experience the same hurdles as you, in that, when I employed Boolean operations I found the results became less and less relevant to me. I am unsure whether this is the fault of the database, or maybe something else, but I am somewhat glad it wasn’t just me facing this hurdle.

    I personally think that your post would benefit from either a small opening or closing statement outside of the comments provided in the table. I found that the way you set your search string results out made it very easy to read, especially along with the clear and precise comments provided for each search string. Another positive about your post was the links to all the references you found, something I completely neglected to do and now regret quite a bit. Over all this is a terrific post.

    Ruth.

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