Feedback to Peers.

1. Comments on initial post: Robyn Beiers http://robynsinquirylearningjpirney.wordpress.com/

Hi Robyn,
I really enjoyed reading your initial reflection. It is reassuring to know that I am not the only teacher who has not used inquiry learning in practice. Your header image did look familiar so I am pleased that you identified it. It is beautiful architecture and could be seen to represent that there are many lighted spaces which you can enter to pursue learning.

Your questions are particularly insightful. I too have wondered how the teacher caters for all students particularly ASD students who do not always adjust to having to start by searching for questions. Most articles I have located have not dealt with this but have been more theoretical in nature. That is why I sometimes prefer websites that have been put together by teachers rather than those that are very academic in their focus.

Your point about authors promoting their own models is interesting. I never thought of it that way so I am looking at what I read a little more critically.

One thing I found a little confusing with your blog is that the comments don’t seem to be on the page where your reflection is. Am I looking in the correct place?

Best wishes with finishing the course Robyn and I hope to read more of your writing in the future.

Cath.

2. Comments on initial post: Alex Gehrke http://alexgehrke.wordpress.com/

Hi Alex,

Two Stars

Compliments on a very well re-searched and cleverly set up blog. Unlike you, I have very little practical or indeed theoretical experience with enquiry learning. I found your comments and reflections informative. The image that you used from Sincero (2006)  provided a clear progression of learning and gave me pause for reflection. I realized that generating new purposeful questions is something that I am struggling with, so that is another question that I now have. Where do they end? English and Mathematics are difficult as you mentioned. I have found this particularly so in my searches as I am trying to relate inquiry learning and English and it does not seem so ‘doable’ with our current curriculum. More searching and digging deeper may come up with some creative solutions.

I found your mind map to be very useful and decided to use the same idea to frame my thinking for my searches. Thanks for that.

A Wish

The one thing that I found a little tricky in your blog was where to put my comments. I noticed this with another blog I looked at too. It is probably just a preference of mine, but I like to have the comment section on the same page as the blog post that I am commenting on. Good luck in your studies and I look forward to reading more of your excellent posts in the future.

Cath.

3. Comments on expert search ProQuest: Ruth Foster http://gogooglegirl.edublogs.org/

Hi Ruth,

Congratulations on some very expert searching! I actually did not think about the country of origin of the databases so you have re-directed my thinking. I suppose because we are so used to the American terminology that it wasn’t at the forefront of my thinking but of course it does make a difference.  As you noted due to the larger population there is a lot more information available from American sources.

I, like you, found that the selection of a specific subject area in ProQuest was useful in sorting the databases that were related to education. I did not find it gave me a lot of choices in what I was searching for though in terms of inquiry learning and English. I would expect that digital literacies would bring up a wider range of results due to the currency of this topic.

Your video of a search was well conducted and you used a variety of filters and keywords to retrieve your result. I did not see a reference to what you found on this post. Do you have an area that you stored the references as it would be interesting to see what items you found? Possibly I missed it. Best wishes for success.

Cath.

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